A+

My first experience was when the mobile blood bank came to school. I filled out a long questionnaire and had my index finger pricked so as to check my iron content. Instructed to recline on a chair with my sleeves rolled up, I was greeted by a cheerful nurse who made light conversation while he tired to find my vein to make the necessary injection.

 Thoroughly absorbed in conversation and compressing the rubber ducky in my hand I was still very conscious when he plunged the needle in my arm. I was fascinated by the transfusion of my blood into the clear bag, which gently rocked. Within 15 minutes it was over, but I had to remain lying down for another 30 minutes.

It was great experience and I still give blood every 6 months, as 1 in 3 people will need blood in their lifetime and only 1 in 30 actually donate regularly.

Even though I am no great humanitarian like Mother Teresa, the milk of humanity still flows through me. Just like my blood group I always feel A+ after I give blood. Being armed with knowledge I helped people is a great incentive.. ohhh the free stickers of "Be nice I gave blood" and ANZAC biscuits the Red Cross gives to donors also works a treat.

umathena umathena
18-21, F
3 Responses Jul 16, 2007

I have given gallons of blood but still feel faint if I look at the blood running through the tube. The first time I gave I looked at the tube and almost fainted. I never got better. Now when I give I look at the ceiling, count the tiles, anything so as to not look at the tube carrying my blood to the bag. Does that make me a sissy?

i feel the same way. even though i'm not very religiuos, actually i'm anti-religion ,but still want to help people. as soon as i turn 17, i'm gonna donate blood. <br />
do you know whether you can donate blood if you smoke?? cause i'm really not ready to give up just yet... ;//

GOOD ON YOU! not enough people who are able to donate are willing to. it might very well be their own child that needs the blood or an aunt or uncle but this is not a consideration until the moment their people are in need.