Climb Out Into The Air

Orlando Martinez May 22 20077
6020 Kathryn Ave. SE # 16
Albuquerque NM 97108

Climb Out Into the Air
Buddha explains no thing arises without cause, there is no uncaused cause. Some people believe the appearance of miraculous and astounding individuals are caused by the God given spiritual soul i.e. the vital creative benevolent principle in the emotions, and actions of humans. The word soul is used in a secular manner to describe the exceptional: soul food, soul music, soul kisses, soul mate and soul brother. Soul implies that the object of its attention is outstanding and the very essence of good.
Joseph Conrad writes: “A human that is born falls into a dream like a human who falls into the sea and spends its life trying to climb out into the air.“ The faithful believe the soul/spirit can lift them out of the sea. But because the soul resides in the invisible subconscious mind, what we presume to know about it will always be a supposition and a mystery until it is personally felt. The soul shows us the marvelous and mystical underpinnings of reality and make us wonder.
Some people are blessed with soul, unknowingly, and it is the events of history that chooses the time of their appearance. Some of these people are Muhammad Ali, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Cesar Chavez, Sophia and Hans Scholl- German martyrs executed by the Nazis in 1941. Sophia Scholl knows the soul when she writes about pressing her face to an apple tree, “Could it be I hear a secret throbbing. I press my face to the trees dusky warm bark, and think, My Homeland, and I am so expressively graceful.”
In the soul song requiem,Wind Under My Wings, Pattie LaBell sings to her departed sister, Jackie. LaBell tells her sister, in an voice soaring with soul, You ‘re the wind under my wings, Jackie, and in another line, Did you ever know you ‘re my hero. They are words of love sang for the listening soul of her sister and as a message, a reminder, to the listeners that if they love someone to tell them that before it’s to late. Pattie LaBell sings: Life is not about money or fame: it’s about soul.
Other soul songs with lyrical distinctive messages of love, hope and revolution are, Starry Night , a song about Vincent Van Gogh, Bridge Over Trouble Waters, Blowin' in the Wind; Sing by Barbara Streisand; We Shall Over Come and the mournful Taps that honors the fallen. The music is wonderful but it is the words of songs that captures the heart and soul, enriches life and makes them special. Modern soul songs of this nature are as vital and important as great literature.
Maya Lin gives “cause” when she said the Vietnam Memorial Wall was conceptualized to be completed by the thoughts and the feelings-meaning sorrow and love- that the people brought to it. It is a way of saying that once we can confront and go beyond death, we find renewed life. When the mourners look into the polished black granite of the wall they can see their faces, with the names of the honored dead cast over them, and at that moment they become part of the mystic and magic soulful essence of Vietnam Memorial Wall.
Maya Lin's’ soul, the souls of the mourners and the dead are imbued in the spirituality (soul) radiating from the Vietnam Memorial Wall. It is a memorial that honors the men and women who were killed in vain in sorrow of the Vietnam War. It is an antiwar memorial that does not glorify war nor the state.
When Buddha explains: no thing arises without cause, there is no uncaused cause- what Buddha is saying is that there is no happenstance or miracles because everything has cause. Einstein said the universe was not created by accident i.e. had cause.
There was confirmation the souls presence at the opening ceremonies of the 1996 Atlanta Georgia Olympic games. Where a full stadium and millions of television viewers watched as the torch bearer, Muhammad Ali, a beloved American hero, climbed the stadium stairs, in the radiant aura of his soul and truth, to light the Olympic flame.
The name of the torch carrier was not announced but everyone knew instantly who it was and a wave of wonder swept the stadium. “It’s Muhammad Ali.” they said in amazed voices, some with tears of joy in their eyes, as a huge cheer rose from crowd into the night sky. Such honor and adoration has no been accorded to many men or women. Muhammad Ali is a honored legacy of the Civil Rights era, the struggle to stop the Vietnam War and the history of our land. He is a national treasure.
It is said no narcissistic human can reflect the love and the bidding of the soul. Marilyn Monroe had fame, fortune, and bueaty-the temporary possessions of a secular life-and was still unfulfilled and went looking for love in all the wrong places. Marilyn had trouble in identifying herself even when looking in a mirror.
Marilyn, like most of us, was searching for her soul. Marilyn did not have heroes, beliefs, faith or mentors wise enough to interrupt her plunge into the hell of drugs and fractured identity. She had lost the beat, crucial to keeping her song in rhythm, and was a magicians trick. Did President John F. Kennedy sense this when he introduced her at his birthday celebration as the late Marilyn Monroe, three months before she committed suicide. Spiritually dead she died alone one night in a drug induced frantic flight from the emotion pain of herself and a reality that had become a demon.
The reason for Marilyn Monroe sadness is expressed in the lyrics of a Cole Porter Lorenz Harts song, Spring is Here: Spring is here why doesn't it delight me / Spring is here why doesn't it excite me / Maybe its because nobody loves me.
But she died redeemed and standing up to be counted. Marilyn Monroe last picture was The Misfits. A movie about a woman who teams up with three men to capture wild horses. The movie moves pleasantly along with Marilyn not knowing the fate of the horses they had captured.
Until the day she innocently asked one of the men, Clark Gable, where they were going to take the captured horses and he replied they were going to be sold for dog food. Marilyn immediately came unhinged and cried. “Oh, no!!.” “Why didn’t you tell me !!’ jumps up and runs into a field barren of foliage, turns with her knees together, hand grasped in front of them, face contorted with anguish, and her body bent over in emotional pain and cried in despair, “Murderers.!! Murderers!!” at the startled men. Sending the message that a horrible crime was being committed. A crime against the humanity of the soul.
There she was a narcissistic women-thought of as sex symbol, and the late Marilyn Monroe-emotionally alive, vibrant and dazzling in her protestation of the coming deaths of the innocent horses and against a world she did not understand. Marilyn's performance was so passionate and authentic that one could conceive that it was the real Marilyn Monroe on that barren field doing what the soul asks of a compassionate soulful women.
The soul, the integrity and nobleness in humans, is described in Arthur Koester book, Darkness at Noon. He writes about the courageous, and doomed (many were executed the next day), communist prisoners who proudly sang the communist anthem The International , from a upper cell blocks of a fascist prison during the Spanish Civil War, as they waited to be executed. They truly believed that communism would eradicate poverty and courageously gave their lives for that cause.
And I cannot take leave at this moment because it is essential to my soul that I write-in remembrance-about Bartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicolo Sacco, Italian immigrants and anarchist who were executed in 1929, for a crime they did not commit, by the state of Massachusetts. In his last letter, expressed in wonderful words that are intrinsic to the soul, Bartolomeo Vanzetti shows he understanding the mythic meaning of their martyrdom: “I f it had not been for these things(the trial,death sentence and innocents ) I might have live my life talking on street corners to scorning men. I might have died. unmarked, unknown, a failure. Now we ( meaning his codefendant Nicolo Sacco) are not a failure. This is our career and our triumph. Never in my full life could we hope to do such good work for tolerance, for justice, for man’s understanding of man as we do now by accident. Our words-our lives, our pains-nothing. The taking of our lives-lives of a good shoe maker and a poor fish peddler -all. The last moments belong to us-that agony is our triumph.”
And with those finale words, imbued with soul, Bartolomeo Vanzetti reaches down, from the freedom of air, to pull others out of the sea.
There are children dying of starvation in Kenya. Come join us in saving them. The Children Fund number is 1-800-776-6767. Give and be blessed. It will be good for your soul.









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41-45, M
Jul 24, 2010