Post

Tell President Obama To Put Bush Administration On Trial Before The Icc For Torture

On the morning of August 30th, 2011 former vice president **** Cheny was interviewed on national television. He went on NBC's the Today show to discuss his newly published book "My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir". In this interview with host Matt Lauer, Cheny openly admits to using an extreme interrogation technique on individuals suspected of having information vital to the prevention of terrorist attacks on the US. The specific enhanced interrogation technique is called "waterboarding". For those of you who may be unfamiliar with waterboarding, allow me to paint a picture you. Waterboarding is a form of torture in which water is poured over the face of an immobilized captive, causing the individual to experience the sensation of drowning. The head is tilted back and water is poured into the upturned mouth or nose. Eventually the subject cannot exhale more air or cough out more water, the lungs are collapsed, and the sinuses and trachea are filled with water. The subject is drowned from the inside, filling with water from the head down. The chest and lungs are kept higher than the head so that coughing draws water up and into the lungs while avoiding total suffocation. "His sufferings must be that of a man who is drowning, but cannot drown."
Despite being waterboarded 183 times in March 2003, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed did not divulge actionable intelligence until at least 2006, withholding the information under torture. KSM revealed it only under the sophisticated non-coercive persuasion favored by professional interrogators.
In 2007 it was reported that the CIA used waterboarding on extrajudicial prisoners and that the Department of Justice had authorized the procedure, even though the United States government hanged Japanese soldiers for waterboarding US prisoners of war in World War II. During the presidency of George W. Bush, U.S. government officials at various times said they did not believe waterboarding to be a form of torture. To justify its use of waterboarding, the Bush administration issued classified legal opinions that argued for a narrow definition of torture under U.S. law, including the Bybee memo, which it later withdrew.
Dr. Allen Keller, the director of the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture, has treated "a number of people" who had been subjected to forms of near-asphyxiation, including waterboarding. In an interview for The New Yorker, he argued that "it was indeed torture. 'Some victims were still traumatized years later', he said. One patient couldn't take showers, and panicked when it rained. 'The fear of being killed is a terrifying experience', he said". Keller also stated in his testimony before the Senate "Waterboarding or mock drowning, where a prisoner is bound to an inclined board and water is poured over their face, inducing a terrifying fear of drowning clearly can result in immediate and long-term health consequences. As the prisoner gags and chokes, the terror of imminent death is pervasive, with all of the physiological and psychological responses expected, including an intense stress response, manifested by tachycardia and gasping for breath. There is a real risk of death from actually drowning or suffering a heart attack or damage to the lungs from inhalation of water. Long term effects include panic attacks, depression and PTSD. I remind you of the patient I described earlier who would panic and gasp for breath whenever it rained even years after his abuse."
If you believe that **** Cheny, George W. Bush and various other members of the Bush administration must be tried in the ICC for torture tactics used during Bush's term, follow the link below to sign the petition urging president Obama to conduct a thorough investigation into the use of waterboarding and to insist that these men be brought to justice by the ICC.

http://www.change.org/petitions/torture-is-torture-even-if-the-us-government-does-it

Thank you
Caleb
calebforaction calebforaction 26-30, M Sep 8, 2011

Your Response

Cancel