IQ's Triple-edged Sword

To this day, the psychological and psychiatric communities question the validity of the measures used to assess intelligence- how much weight should any IQ test or battery of tests have when each one makes so many assumptions about what intelligence is and how it manifests in individuals of all walks of life?

In my humble opinion, the results of IQ tests rarely do more good than harm- for those who thought themselves more intelligent than scores revealed, it's sufficient cause for identity crises; for those who score higher than what's considered "average," it can engender a false sense of superiority and/or edify (with authority) their feelings of failing to live up to their potential. Not unlike the SAT, the results are beyond questionable (if you think I'm wrong, take a peek at the correlations between SAT scores and undergraduate matriculation), and the determinations made because of them range from which academic track a young student is assigned to asserting the extent to which an individual can be held culpable for his/her actions in a court of law.

I'm grateful that my parents disallowed my elementary school's administration of an IQ test in kindergarten- they later explained to me that they knew I was very bright and that the score wouldn't improve my quality of life. As a result, I was excluded from the gifted and talented program in elementary school, yet I was still placed two grades ahead of my class for reading and math courses. In retrospect, I still think my parents did the right thing.

As a teenager, to determine whether I should be granted untimed testing at my high school, a licensed psychologist spent two hours a day for a week administering the Wechsler Intelligence Scale to me. At the time, I didn't know it was an IQ test, and I wanted untimed testing- thus, I purposefully answered more slowly than I could and then claimed I couldn't complete the final spatial relations puzzle in the five-day escapade (to ensure the desired result). With a score of 137, the psychologist diagnosed me with ADD and recommended  untimed testing to accommodate my disorder. When she told me the score, I immediately wished that I'd known my IQ was being assessed and that I'd completed that final puzzle- such is life.

Overall, I think that other correlations with IQ should be publicized and used to govern how society treats its "elite": The higher the IQ of an individual, the greater likelihood he/she will suffer from mood disorders, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, attachment disorders, and personality disorders. In short, those deemed "intelligent" may be capable of more intellectually, but they're rarely nurtured sufficiently enough to actualize their potential by a culture that expects them to accomplish more with less sensitivity to their emotional needs!
AthenaAdAbsurdum AthenaAdAbsurdum
26-30, F
5 Responses Jun 9, 2007

"Another thing about high IQ's - if you are in the upper 10% bracket of intelligence, you have a more difficult time relating to people with lesser intelligence which makes you a social pariah sometimes."

"The higher the IQ of an individual, the greater likelihood he/she will suffer from mood disorders, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, attachment disorders, and
personality disorders."

Me.

My girlfriend gets insane scores at these, but she says it's 'vague and ultimately futile'.

IQ I think is being used improperly by the head shrinker crowd. IQ is more a test on the logic parts of your brain. The mroe intellectual cold facts. These are great for solving problems, making some money and inventing things. What is a lot more important then intelligence though is wisdom. You can have all the smarts in the world but if you don't know how to tie your shoes you aren't going to get very far. Wagon is a clear case of how far wisdom also called common sense will get you.<br />
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Look at the geniuses throughout histroy. Einstein slept twenty minutes out of every hour. Bruce Lee (who is not a genius by normal means but was a genius when it came to Martial arts) used to hook up an electric pulse to his typewriter to work out while typing. Throughout histroy the truly gifted not the ones slightly above us but the ones way above us have been very essentric.

I don't know whether the two concepts are mutually exclusive OR which would be better for anyone. Emotional Intelligence (EQ in psychometrics) and Resilience (Bronfenbrenner's "R") indicate much more about the decision-making tendencies people have regarding their environments. However, I'd argue that you're an example of someone who is intelligent- possessing qualities social sciences can't quantify but mostly agree define intelligence. What do you think?

Another thing about high IQ's - if you are in the upper 10% bracket of intelligence, you have a more difficult time relating to people with lesser intelligence which makes you a social pariah sometimes. If you don't know about this it can affect your social skills.<br />
Birds of a feather flock together - that old saw applies here.