NEGLECTING the Flag - Pet Peeve #2

Another issue I take umbrage is the mishandling of the Colors, or in civilian parlance the US Flag. I am a Navy Vet, having served proudly for nine years. I respect the Flag of the United States of America. I also respect the 1st Amendment, meaning that if someone wishes to use the Flag as means of protest either by flying upside down or burning it, it’s the right of individual to be able to do so. In my opinion the fact the Flag may be used as in such distasteful manner, gives it respect because the 1st Amendment allows the act.  But what ticks me off is to watch people raise and lower the Flag in a sloppy and uncaring manner.  I work in the Financial District of New York City, every building has a flag flying in front of it. Every day I watch some schlep un-ball the Flag and raise it haphazardly; while at night another schlep lowers the flag as quickly as possible, before balling up inside a cart. This sickens me. This is the most disrespectful thing one can do to the Flag. The actions are loathsome and uncouth because no meaning is given to the act.  And I have indeed told the individuals responsible of this, but it falls on deaf ears.  This isn’t about politics or patriotism, but about the very rights the Flag represents. The Flag should be raised every morning sharply @ 8AM, and lowered slowly at dusk. It should be folded in the proper manner, and stowed neatly away.  No exceptions.

Smokeseek Smokeseek
36-40, M
2 Responses Mar 25, 2009

I don't like seeing it handled in a sloppy or uncaring manner either. It makes me extra proud when I see it done correctly and treated like a ceremony not a task.

If it's not ignorance then it is lack of patriotism that is to blame. I think that loving the rights that the flag represents is patriotism. Disrespect of the flag is either ignorance or anti-american.<br />
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http://www.ushistory.org/BETSY/flagetiq.html<br />
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One acceptable case for an upside down flag:<br />
Flying the American flag upside down is traditionally considered a sign of distress, as it is with all national flags. The signal is one that was used primarily in past centuries (pre-1900s), on the high seas by military and merchant marine vessels alike. While the U.S. Flag Code does permit flying the flag with the union down, it specifies only "...as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property."