Post

Latin... Truly A Gift To Humankind

Language has always been something that has fascinated me; how it can influence societies, cultures as well as political change - it is really amazing and interesting to read and to research. But perhaps for me the only real languages that have ever sparked my interest have been the languages of old; what are foolishly referred to as "dead languages." Sure, they may not be as prominent as they once were, but to refer to them in such a manner bears the same weight of disparagement as any form of desecration to history would. The English language was formed out of many previous languages. Those being, Latin, Greek, Old French and Anglo-Saxon; and furthermore, to a degree, Old Norse. How then can today's societies so flippantly refer to them as "dead" when there is still so much that can be gained from knowing and studying them?

Perhaps no language has sparked my interest as much as Latin does. It is one of only a handful of languages I would ever consider actually properly learning and/or studying. These being of course the aforementioned, Greek, Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse. Contemporary languages and dialects simply do not interest me. I honestly have no interest whatsoever to learn Mandarin or what have you. The tongues of the old world bear far more significance to me and to my outlook on life; the way they have changed and shifted the world (usually for the better) and how influential they have come to be. It just amazes me.

Latin is such a beautiful and unique language, and never has there been one so famously quoted from time immemorial, nor one that was established by such an powerful and learned society. Rome was one of the largest and most prominent empires the world had ever seen and the duration of its reign (and its subsequent influence of humanity thereafter), as well as its many emperors proves how mighty it once was. Great men of varying epochs have used Latin in their works. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for example wrote his requiems using Latin hymns. This language just has such a fascinating and inspiring structure and there truly aren't enough words to express how deeply I adore this deceased Roman language, and how much it means to me. I am a person who possesses Judeo-Christian faith and as such, when I read Latin phrases that were written during Rome's Christianisation-period (things such as Deo Optimo Maximo, Ave Maria and Fides en Lucius Dei) it is just so beautiful and poignant to immerse oneself in.

I love the language of Latin and it is truly an inspiration to me and to my writing. May it live forever on earth and in the heavens; both of God and of the Pantheon.

- Deo Gratias
DrgnLord92 DrgnLord92 18-21, M 1 Response Nov 27, 2011

Your Response

Cancel

Maybe they should offer more languages to learn in school than the basic Spanish... Latin would be a cool language to learn.. but in the was I think of it Latin seems so very Historical

Yeah, I always wanted to learn Latin in school but unfortunately it wasn't offered at my school. So to compensate, I just began studying myself. I have a Latin dictionary at home. My Latin is still quite broken at the moment, but nonetheless it's still a great resource when I need to quote phrase or what have you for my writing or otherwise; I just love it, it's awesome :)