Sorry I Meant Dylan Thomas!

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day; 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 

Though wise men at their end know dark is right, 
Because their words had forked no lightning they 
Do not go gentle into that good night. 

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright 
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, 
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, 
Do not go gentle into that good night. 

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight 
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 

And you, my father, there on the sad height, 
Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray. 
Do not go gentle into that good night. 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 

Dylan Thomas, 1951 or 1952 

:)

koyptakh koyptakh
51-55, M
2 Responses Aug 14, 2010

P.S. "sang and caught the sun in flight" (the 'ordinary' combination) becomes "caught and sang the sun in flight." Dylan Thomas and Bob Dylan have a way of making the ordinary extraordinary.

Hi Kaybea1<br />
serendipitous maybe. I think people who like Bob Dylan will also like Dylan Thomas.<br />
:)

"There was a saviour/ Rarer than radium/ Commoner than water/ Crueler than truth..."
I think Mr. Zimmerman borrowed some of the techniques from DT (interesting initials, considering his manner of death). For example, Bob Dylan's line about "my warehouse eyes, my Arabian drums" is a transposition of "Arabian eyes" and "warehouse drums," which might be the "normal" word combination. DT did similar things, such as in "The Ballad of the Long-Legged Bait," if memory serves (it's been over 20 years since I've read it). One can find other examples in DT and BD. (I'm sure there's a Master's thesis in there someplace, unless it's already been done....)