Baptism In Georgian Farmland

Dade county Georgia, 1981. We just moved from Japan to Georgia and were temporarily housed in a small two bedroom building on the side of a hill, that had windows on three sides overlooking the valley and farm land.

We had just become part of a co-op that did a rotation crop of beans and corn, and also harvested pears, apples and raspberries.

Our day began sunny and cool with an odd dryness in the air and a few clouds steaming in from the west. By 3 PM, it was so dark we could not carry out our work, so we headed home.

Loud thunderous rolls of sound came up behind us. Startled, we whirled around to see lightening streak across the patch of valley we had just left.

We scrambled with all our might, each of us carrying one of our children, and made it inside our home before more thunder and lightening arrived at the crest of our hill, not more than 200 feet behind us.

We crawled over the floor of our home to gather blankets, pillows and flashlights in preparation for an evening of laying flat.

There we stayed, watching our three-sided window panorama of wave after wave of lightening as it hit over our fields, at the tops of higher points around the ridge of hills, and along a path just above the earth in scattered areas.

I cautioned our children to stay put, not touch any wires, the phone, or outlets in the walls that were beside us.

Two and one half hours later, the rain fell in sheets, and pounded our windows on the west side.

It was a fitful sleep taken in moments of relative quiet that were found between clashes of lightening and shaking of windows.

We were struck with awe at the power and ferocity with which Nature welcomed us to the community!!

R

Radiant Radiant
56-60, F
5 Responses Aug 4, 2007

Both of my children were born in Redlands. We have had 1 1/2 inches of rain since Dec 2005 here. We are in the rain shadow of the Ortega Mountains, only 30 miles from the ocean as the crow flies but the rain flies over like the crow - on to easier places to roost.

I was born and raised in California when it was still 40 percent farm land ie. plenty of oranges, grape vinyards and Guernsey milk cows. <br />
<br />
The Santa Anna winds could whip a fire into a terrible inferno.<br />
<br />
We were visiting for a few months in 2003 because my mother was sick and my daughter (who lives there) was getting married. <br />
<br />
In that week, 4 or five fires got started and the ENTIRE range of mountains that are arranged a little like and elongated bowl were on fire at the same time. The fire extended from the Mt. Baldy area, through the Lake Arrowhead range, along the beach, along Palomar, and into San Diego. <br />
<br />
Everyone had smoke in their hair, drapes, pillow cases, rugs, noses and lungs.<br />
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The fire came one block from where we were staying in Highland, so we took off and stayed with relatives in Redlands. <br />
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It was STINKING hot, ashes were flying everywhere, people were dumbfounded and doing stupid things. <br />
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THAT IS WHEN WE WOULD HAVE LOVED TO SEE SOME RAIN!!<br />
<br />
R

Lightning is spectacular even in Southern CA but not as specatular as in other places. We were in Trinidad CO driving back to CA and a lightning storm was making a grand show through our windshield. Enjoying the show caused considerable damage to our vehicle. A cow ran across the road in front of us and we hit it. Poor thing died. We were OK but the truck was a disaster. Another time lightning struck a dead tree in our 1/2 mile long driveway - it traveled down the tree and because of the wind it crossed the road and burned the hill by our house right down to the driveway. The chaparral has never grown back on our half of the hill. You can see the line going up the hill where the fire burned. That was in 1995. I've been in hurricanes in FL and GA too - they can be scary.

The Elements of Nature's Power, although at times terrifying, also assures me that there are greater things going about the universe, and that all elements never die, they just change configuration from time to time. <br />
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I truly enjoyed the story that you have shared about lightening balls. <br />
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What a fantastic, exhilarating, memorable experience for you!<br />
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Georgia and Tennessee are two gorgeous States. <br />
<br />
I adore the people, horses, greenry<br />
and food.<br />
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When I first arrived, a neighbor told me that the ground on our plae was so fertile that almost anything could be grown.<br />
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One day I had a bag of fresh in the hull peanuts so on a lark, I told my friend and family that I was going to make a mounded row and stick 12 peanuts in a straingt ling down that row. If the ground was that great, I would have 12 plants. <br />
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It happened. I had plenty of fresh peanuts for a long time!<br />
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I keep hoping that all this land does not become build up into freeways and housing. People still need land to grown food for the world. <br />
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<br />
R

I grew up as a youngster in Brunswick Ga. It's spectacular Lightening storms engindered a love of lightening that nearly cost me my life many years later in the Colorado mountains. I had never seen ball lightening and we rode into a medow as a herd of cattle was struck by it and out guide told us to all dismount lay the horses down and lay on top of them. It was a strange and horrible sight to see living animals struck down by the huge balls carroming about like a crazed game of snooker. I will never forget feeling the rain and laying on top of my trusty horseand feeling my hair as well as his raising up from the electricity. It passed in a few of the longest minutes in my life leaving about 8 or 9 steers smoking in the grass. <br />
My Mother used to visably quake at each strike but felt it was poor form to exibit her terror to us children. She would lay on her bed knees scrunched up and gather her little chicks around like a mother hen. I gloried in the power of it. The very feel of the air and the smell of ozone were exilerating to me and still are. great story it brought back plesant memories.