Unless You're African, Living In The Rift Valley...

... then you're an immigrant. No exceptions. We evolved in Africa & small bands of humans made it out, often during wetter periods, through the Sahara. The whole world immigrated at some time or other!

Lazarus42 Lazarus42
46-50, M
4 Responses Feb 26, 2010

You could argue it in a Biblical sense too... If Christians like to believe that we all came from Adam and Eve, then they came out of the Garden of Eden.. Is that in America??? NO!! ergo... all peoples in America were immigrants at some stage.

wow thanks for that education

No, I wasn't. Were you there to see the birth of your great great grandparents? No you weren't. But you know that they were born & I bet you could find out where. <br />
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Tracing families doesn't change with scale. Research, evidence, conjecture... la<x>yer upon la<x>yer. If it be genetics, the study of languages, anthropology, archaeology or simply visiting the local libraries, church records, studying the photographs & mementos they left behind... It's just tracing our family back to it's origins. <br />
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Take a look at this... from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human<br />
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Anatomically modern humans evolved from archaic Homo sapiens in Africa in the Middle Paleolithic, about 200,000 years ago. By the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic 50,000 BP (Before Present), full behavioral modernity, including language, music and other cultural universals had developed.<br />
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The broad study of African genetic diversity headed by Dr. Sarah Tishkoff found the San people to express the greatest genetic diversity among the 113 distinct populations sampled, making them one of 14 "ancestral population clusters". The research also located the origin of modern human migration in south-western Africa, near the coastal border of Namibia and Angola.[17]<br />
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The out of Africa migration is estimated to have occurred about 70,000 years BP. Modern humans subsequently spread to all continents, replacing earlier hominids: they inhabited Eurasia and Oceania by 40,000 BP, and the Americas at least 14,500 years BP.[29] They displaced Homo neanderthalensis and other species descended from Homo erectus (which had inhabited Eurasia as early as 2 million years ago) through more successful reproduction and competition for resources.[30]<br />
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Evidence from archaeogenetics accumulating since the 1990s has lent strong support to the "out-of-Africa" scenario, and has marginalized the competing multiregional hypothesis, which proposed that modern humans evolved, at least in part, from independent hominid populations.[31]<br />
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Geneticists Lynn Jorde and Henry Harpending of the University of Utah propose that the variation in human DNA is minute compared to that of other species. They also propose that during the Late Pleistocene, the human population was reduced to a small number of breeding pairs – no more than 10,000, and possibly as few as 1,000 – resulting in a very small residual gene pool. Various reasons for this hypothetical bottleneck have been postulated, one being the Toba catastrophe theory.[32]

Were you there to see it?