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I Probably Love It

I've always loved QM. Ever since I came to know of it's existence, anyway.

The QM core course was one of the courses that I anticipated very eagerly in engineering college. After months of intellectual starvation, I was looking for a challenge. It did not disappoint. The theory started out relatively simple but quickly reached ridiculous levels of complexity. And it wasn't just mathematical complexity either. The concepts themselves aren't easy to wrap your head around. You cannot get a "feel" for QM they way you can for Newtonian Mech. There are just no classical approximations you can use to get an idea of how things work.

And that, to me, is part of the charm. The subatomic world breaks all the presuppositions and presumptions of our existence. Particles aren't just particles, waves aren't just waves, and the determinism that we are used to simply does not exist.

The world of QM is wondrous and exciting. All kinds of weird **** happens. And it goes extremely well with my other area of interest - electronics. I've been reading voraciously on the topic. I'm far from satisfied yet. I still know very little and I'm going to read every ******* book on it that I can lay my hands on. And this time, I'm going to read to understand, not just for grades.
QM for the win, yeah!
DesiAngrez DesiAngrez 22-25, M 3 Responses Mar 21, 2011

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@Braintumor<br />
Lol. What a klutz, eh? Well, I have to say, M-theory is totally beyond my level as of now. You've pretty much got to know everything else in physics before you can even get started on M-theory or other string theories. <br />
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@private<br />
Yeah, the problem is, even with a 3-D model, it's really hard trying to get a physical idea of QM concepts. We're just so flipping used to the idea of rigid particles and bodies that the brain just doesn't go beyond that, physically. So you have to try and imagine it all. <br />
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I mean, you're talking about particles for example, but basically, there ARE no particles! Just probability densities.

@Braintumor<br />
Lol. What a klutz, eh? Well, I have to say, M-theory is totally beyond my level as of now. You've pretty much got to know everything else in physics before you can even get started on M-theory or other string theories. <br />
<br />
@private<br />
Yeah, the problem is, even with a 3-D model, it's really hard trying to get a physical idea of QM concepts. We're just so flipping used to the idea of rigid particles and bodies that the brain just doesn't go beyond that, physically. So you have to try and imagine it all. <br />
<br />
I mean, you're talking about particles for example, but basically, there ARE no particles! Just probability densities.

I've been interested in astronomy ever since I was a kid and after watching The Universe on the History channel I love how the experts break it down and show us with 3d models how particles interact with each other and how the world works at subatomic levels. It's so fascinating and breathtaking learning how the universe was formed and the various energies that play pivotal roles behind the scenes. I'm not a quantum mechanics expert, just a guy with a curiosity into how the world works from a physics perspective. Different particles colliding with each other to form fusion within a star and whatnot. I LOVE 3d models. I can't understand any other way than by seeing to believe it.