Post

Thanks Dad... I Guess

I know that I'm not the only person to have had this experience. Life is not always sweet but we can make of it what we choose.

My father was completely disassociated… from everything not just me. When he got home from the office he sat and played solitaire, never speaking or interacting with the family. Occasionally he would erupt in a rage and beat my older brother, never me and the outbursts were rare but the risk was always there just below the surface. He actually just sat silent in his chair 95% of the time for 15 years. Perhaps there were reasons for his state but that’s another story. This one is about me.

I was an accomplished athlete, playing many sports in which I excelled. Each year at the awards banquet I had to mount the stage to receive my awards, best hitter, best offensive lineman, best defensive lineman, outstanding player etc with no one in the audience. I sat with my coaches for the dinner and was ashamed that my family did not attend. None of my family, not my father, mother, brother or sister ever attended any of my games. Was I not good enough? My fellow players were cheered on by their family. But I was only recognized by my teammates and coaches.

At age 10 I began martial arts training (on my own initiative and along with my other sporting endeavors). Over the years I became a very proficient competitor, winning in local, regional and national competitions. Eventually becoming a pro and making it onto ABC TV’s Wide World of sports. Once again my parents never recognized any of my achievements. My neighbors saw me on the tube but I have no idea if my father ever saw me in action.

What can I say about it? I learned to act in my own self interests, setting my own agenda and judging the results of my actions without input from others. Yes I became isolated and perhaps I was still seeking approval through my continued involvement in high level combat sport. Maybe my need to compete and excel is the result of my parent’s lack of involvement but what ever the cause I have chosen to seek excellence and become my own person.

So…. thanks dad… I made it anyway.

----- Update 7/5/10 ------
I wrote this story in a couple of minutes without much thought. I’ve been over these circumstances many, many times and had thought I was beyond the whole thing and I don’t know what brought me to the point of writing about it.
 
The gracious response of EPeeps to this post has been surprising and humbling.
However what is most surprising is my reaction to some of the story’s negative comments.
EP is a free for all and any story out there is fair game for anyone to comment on, positively or negatively.
I’m a “big boy” and have had my share of banal, pointless or vindictive comments on my stories. So what? Its no big deal and most of us have had similar experiences when we post. We usually just blow them off with a shrug.
 
Yet when “yeshucan” posted a less than complementary comment I went off.
What was THAT about? (NDD rolls his eyes at himself!)
It is true that he made inaccurate assumptions, charged me with misrepresentation and gave me impossible advice (both of my parents are long dead and buried) but so what? He was not grossly offensive nor did he score a telling blow to my sense of honor. So why did I bother to respond at all?
 
As some of you have commented these types of situations generate feelings of inferiority and self doubt in children living in dysfunctional families. I to have had to deal with my own “unworthiness” and although I thought I’d gotten it under control (it’s been a hell of a long time since these events occurred) apparently I’m still struggling with the issue.
 
I’ve been in the process of trying to address an age old and important question. “Who am I, really?” Am I just the sum of my experiences or is the state of my consciousness as I experience life the primary factor? This question calls for close examination of my entire life and it appears I’ve brought unresolved feelings and memories to the surface. My unworthiness now seems to be bubbling just below my daily stream of consciousness and unfortunately I’m not advanced enough to meet a direct assault on my worth as a human with equanimity.
 
So…. once again EP has served its purpose. I am being forced to deal with my delusions and release my attempts to grasp at a (long held) false persona as the “alpha dog” to protect myself from the wounds of long ago. I know that I’ll never “get over it” because the wounds have long since scared over and that inflexible tissue will be a life long part of my psyche.
Now I’ll just have to learn to let it be, accepting it and try to learn to view both my father and myself with compassion. Wish me luck.
 
I’m still smarting from this experience and I wonder if I owe “yeshucan” an apology or a thank you for focusing my attention on an unresolved bit of my past - (nods to WiB). Anyone care to offer me advice on this?

BTW: I was never a national champ and was mediocre as a pro. This story was not intended to garner me any ego strokes. I cited my atheletics to raise the issue of parental support. I I believe I have done other things that outweigh any achievements I managed in athletics.
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newdaydogEP newdaydogEP 70+, M 81 Responses Jun 20, 2010

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I look at it like I survived and made something out of myself in spite of it. I owe no thanks to my parents.

The sad thing is that you have unpleasant memories of your parents. I hope someday you will find yourself able to understand them and forgive them. It isn't for them you do this, but for yourself. It worked for me after many years and after they were long gone. Still it was better late than never.

Whatever life experiences you've had (and, by the way, I'm certainly sorry to hear about some of the rougher ones) have clearly made you a very wise and deep-thinking person. That is always evident in your stories or your comments on other people's stories.

My dad always went to his room and watched the news!<br />
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It was very discouraging as a child, he never knew which grade I was in!<br />
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I think I understand what you mean.<br />
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Hugs

I had many difficult conversations with my dad - conversations that were always in my head. Intil I spoke them he and I could not have any real relationship. Once I spoke them we fought and it was hard, but we both grew - and now we are best friends - something that the rest of the family cannot believe and something I never thought could happen.<br />
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Give him a chance to change by speaking your truth - and give yourself room for a new conversation in your head. It can be life changing for you both -and what do you really have to lose?<br />
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On who I am - that is connected...I believe I am many things - son, brother, cousin, friend, loner, socialite, professional, loser, winner, but most importantly one with all. genuinely and inseparable...<br />
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Through experiments over the past few decades physicists have discovered matter to be completely mutable into other particles or energy and vice-versa and on a subatomic level, matter does not exist with certainty in definite places, but rather shows 'tendencies' to exist. Quantum physics is beginning to realise that the Universe appears to be a dynamic web of interconnected and inseparable energy patterns. If the universe is indeed composed of such a web, there is logically no such thing as a part. This implies we are not separated parts of a whole but rather we are the Whole. American physicist, Barbara Brennan<br />
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and consciousness underlies all reality, has striking parallels with the ancient Esoteric concept that all reality is the manifestation of an infinite Singularity - call it what you may, many call it God.

well, my dad is kind of same too. he never really talk, he just sits there in kitchen watching tv, he is like a stranger to us, but it's when he is in a good mood, if he is not then he drinks, and then starts fight about the most stupid things, and he usually fight with my older sister. and it hurts that nothing i can do about it or to stop it. i used to play in school basketball team and i was good. at my first match, everyones familes was there to watch them or to support but mine didnt show up, they never cared about me.whenever there was a meeting at school that teachers talk about students to parents. my parents never came. but that is ok. as long as they dont start fight.<br />
and that is nice that you are a good father now and caring about your son. <br />
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wish you best.

your very lucky, unlike you my parents were too strict that never let me join extracurricular activities or socialize w/ people

Wow, NDD, I think our father's may have been related...<br />
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This is horrible to say, but sometimes, I wish I had a calendar to count down the days to his leaving this earth. (And now I expect scathing comments on this statement.) <br />
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Sometimes I think my father's only goal in life is to put me down so he can feel good about himself. I am married (my parents' marriage was a disaster and they are split up) have 3 great children and have earned a Masters' degree, which I completely pursued and financed on my own. What does my "father" focus on when I walk into a family gathering? I'm fat and ugly (I'm probably 10 lbs. over my "ideal" weight and my husband is still very attracted to me.) My kids are never going to be as good as their cousins (wrong, wrong, wrong.) The latest dig was how unappetizing the birthday cake I made for daughter was (the frosting was dyed blue, as requested by my daughter. Still, as a guest in my own home, he felt completely comfortable insulting me in front of everyone--including my daughter whose birthday we were celebrating.) <br />
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In short, this man is toxic. Probably the best thing I ever did, after joining groups such as Adult Children of Alcoholics and Dysfunctional Families, scouring the most current Catholic catechism on the 4th Commandment, and talking to priests about all of this is: this person was responsible for my exisistence but nothing more. My true Father is in Heaven, watching over me and providing me with the comfort and guidance I so desperately crave. <br />
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I don't think you are abnormal for having reoccurring doubts and grief over your relationship, or lack thereof, with this person from your past. If you only knew of all of the times I sobbed over my sense of my "lack of perfection" and my hurt and shame over who I am because I was never good enough for him. It finally dawned on me that once I let go of the wanting and accepted that what I wanted was never going to happen, I was allowed to grieve the loss and move on. <br />
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It makes me sad to think of this person, sitting alone, not knowing how to develop a relationship with me. But what is sadder is the fact that he will never take direction from anyone on how to do it. He thinks it is all my fault and that I am just a spoiled, ungrateful child. I beg to differ. <br />
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My siblings have acknowledged his warped and cruel behavior but basically look the other way. They have told me that since this is the way he is, I may as well get used to it. The thing is, I am Target #1. If I leave the picture, then he'll move on to one of them. What I suspect is they are grateful to me for being the Whipping Post so they don't have to be. Once, when my dad went off in front of my whole family at a get together about how fat I am and how ashamed my husband should be of me, I asked my mother why she didn't step up to my defense. Her reply? "I didn't want to make a scene." Wow. As a mother myself, my kids safety and well-being is tantamount. Any threat to them is a threat to ME. I would easily throw myself in front of a train for them. For my own "mother" to say this, again, I grieved the loss of NOT having a mother. (She's done some incredibly cruel things herself.) <br />
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I have to say that my dad did have a rotten upbringing but never sought out assistance on coping with it. My mother was nothing but unhappy during the years they lived together and we all were well-aware of it. <br />
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My husband and I have created a loving home and nurturing environment for our family. Nothing will ever permeate this. And if I have to cut these people out of my life in order to maintain it, so be it. <br />
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I expect to have pangs of guilt after these people pass from this earth--I occasionally get pangs of guilt now--but I when I think about everything they have done to hurt me and take no accountability for it, well, I figure I will pray for their souls. I occasionally pray for them now but I have no faith in them ever evolving. They are utter disasters and children themselves. <br />
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I guess I should have posted my own story and I am sorry that I took up all of this space but your story gave me a lot of comfort. I didn't feel so alone. Thank you for having the courage to speak. I guess my parents never realized the power and responsibility they had but it is sort of too late now. The silver lining in all of this is, for me, to take the bad and learn from it. To never go there with my own children. To be strong enough to break the cycle.

yeshucan: you're a heartless poc. You sound like My father. My father came home everyday from work and didn't let me in his office to say hello, didn't ever sit down at the same table as me when I ate, but sat down when I left and hi ate with my brother, didn't care about any of my football games' half-time shows (I was in dance). Didn't care to attend either of my college graduations. And constantly told my brother while I walked out of the room that he's to stay away from people like (his sister). You yeshucan, are unempathetic, don't care to relate, don't care to see it from a youth's perspective. All you see is the money involved. If that's all life was about then all you had to do was make a lot of money then people would only make money and not smile at the fruits of their labor. THAT is what his story was about. His father failed to take pride in his offspring's efforts and achievements in trying to make his father proud of who he was becoming. What is so wrong with wanting and hoping for your parent's approval and accolades? That is all he had hoped for. That is the point of the story. Or am I wrong newdaydogEP?

Forgiveness is a hugely complicated issue. This word is tossed around so easily, generally by people who want to tell others how to live their lives. In my opinion, and from the perspective of my own set of horrible father experiences, recurring despicable actions over time do not deserve forgiveness. What they deserve is to be left behind (not forgotten) through personal growth, the kind of growth that does not diminish those actions, but rather creates a vastly better world. <br />
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So perhaps this is not exactly eloquent. The aphorism, "The best revenge is living well" says it better.

Each one of us will face challenges on this earth. You faced yours at a young age, the seemingly lack of emotional support young kids and teens need to build confidence which most parents give easily and generously, as if by innate guidance, to their children.<br />
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Your parent's lack of attention, is the very reason you were so competitive. Many young people who do not have parental acknowledgement and attention (myself included) will put more muscle and brain power into their effort to succeed.<br />
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More than likely all the extra effort to succeed was conjured up from the starved for attention childhood psyche in a desparate maneuver for the much desired attention from one's parents.<br />
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As most of us learn after the first of achievements.....the parents behavior never changes, even after a son's or daughter's achievement, no real praise or comendation is noted. <br />
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What is interesting is that others take notice. <br />
Society notices. The community notices. <br />
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As we mature into adulthood, although the pain of not receiving praise from parents is still present in one's heart, something new begins to emerge - the joy of belonging to a community who recognizes your efforts and who embraces you.<br />
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To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.<br />
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I believe in the above statement and the fact that there is more to our life plan than we are aware of. Personally, I don't believe in coincidences - I believe you were born to your specific parents for a reason. <br />
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Each of us are born into specific circumstances, into a specific family to learn specific spiritual growth. Only through trying situations do we learn to stretch our spirtual muscle. <br />
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You may not have become half the man you are today had it not been for the drive to succeed.You met your challenge and instead of feeling sorry for yourself, instead of giving up on yourself when you had no one cheering for you, while seeing all your teammates being cheered by their families, you plowed ahead. <br />
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Under your inner guidance and those role models around you, you learned about discipline and hard work to achieve your goals and never gave up.<br />
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What a wonderful role model you are to those kids and teens today, who are facing the same challenges you once faced. <br />
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How wonderful would it be for you to volunteer as a coach or to simply volunteer as a motivational speaker to Junior High and/or High School kids. <br />
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What was the heavenly plan for your soul? <br />
Perhaps for your soul to recognize it's own strength and to teach others, in less than supportive circumstances the attribute of self reliance.<br />
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The creation of your family circumstances in which you could experience of "no support, no recognition" may have been formed for your soul's challenge.<br />
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Yes, it is good to thank your dad. Thank your mom too. They ignored you and your soul grew from this experience.

Fake it till you make it, Try to be Happy. GIve yourself sometime and try to cry see what happends? How does it make you feel? Bless you and your family. Do you believe in jesus? I don't know if thier another way on asking this question with out offending you? What advise can you help me with me, I'm on the verge of being like you... im 21 and want to be on the top of any profession I chose...I can't understand if my motive is true or if it stems from anger??

Im with nynilda on this one! You accomplished alot by succeeding ~ kudos!

I understand this story. My father was never present physically. I had a terrible step father who was completely detached unless he was being destructive occasionally. Zero fun living on egg shells. And then I married a man who isn't willing to participate in life in general. He sounds so much like your father. Good news is I just asked him to leave. So now after 23 years it is finally over. Nothing I hate more than being ignored. Unless it is maybe being terrified when they finally blow up.<br />
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Sounds like you excelled inspite of your father's inability to interact. It is sad your family wouldn't acknowledge you. Sounds like you are continueing on your journey despite it all. Don't let anyone tell you to "get over it" THAT is passive dead ridiculousness. It reflects on the responder more than you. I often find people can become uncomfortable and even attack you when you try to face things that are wrong. They pobably can't deal with whatever and think burying it al will save them from it. I don't really know. <br />
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But you sound like a survivor to me. Good for you. Doesn't sound like you owe anybody an apology for this post. Who am I to judge? Who is anybody to judge you who hasn't walked in your shoes? Your story is inspirational.

Seems to me that what was written was bottled up for some time and finally letting it all out. If the thoughts of your parents weren't important then this story would be a farce at best, yet it wasn't a farce. Even when your parents are gone, you are some how trying to reach out to them in one manner or another.<br />
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Keep writing because you will eventually won't feel so isolated and more open about what has gone on with your life.

I am sorry for your father's indifference. I have one like that. It is much easier for him to disconnect from issues than to try and solve them. Unfortunately, I have inherited this trait from him somewhat. Not totally. I also have the urge to speak my mind like my mom. I also have her temper. My mom was mostly around for our school activities. PTA, Room Mother, etc. Our dad traveled a lot or wasn't home much because of work. Also, he got brainwashed by the TV evangelist church he was working for. It made me hate religion for a while. My parents got divorced because he had an affair with a woman (atheist) who worked at that church with him and was invited into our home because our naive mother felt sorry for her! So he is still married to this woman and I have been cursed by her afflictions before she married my dumb dad! I smoke and drink like a fish. She was a smokaholic and alcoholic when she met my dad and quit a couple years after. I was a goody-two-shoes then all of a sudden I was smoking and drinking as a teenager. I must ask, "wtf???" She fricking retired after marrying my dad at like 34!!! My mom just turned 70 and she is still working!!! WTF???" Okay, where is the justice in that? <br />
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Your parents were there all the time but for whatever reason, you didn't think so. I don't know why. Just because they didn't pay attention to every single accomplishment??? I think that just their support for you explains much of your achievement. Just because they didn't go to every single game doesn't mean they didn't care. They don't have to be smothering you with cake, giant parties, banners and going to every single event to show that they care about you. I don't know why you are making such a big deal out of stuff that obviously didn't affect your growth in society all that much. I could understand if you turned into a crackhead, but you didn't. You should be glad for that.<br />
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After my parents' divorce, my dad was never around and my mom was working 70 hrs. a week. We had no babysitter because she couldn't afford one and my dad wouldn't take us because his wife didn't like kids. So we were on our own and ran loose. Who should wonder why? We were 2 young girls and not boys. I am sorry, but it seems to me that you did not appreciate your family. Just because they didn't go to every single event or praise you for every single achievement. What do you think happens to girls who are left to fend for themselves at an early age? Yeah, I totally can understand your frustration with an indifferent father. Can you understand total abandonment by one? As a girl???

I am sorry for your father's indifference. I have one like that. It is much easier for him to disconnect from issues than to try and solve them. Unfortunately, I have inherited this trait from him somewhat. Not totally. I also have the urge to speak my mind like my mom. I also have her temper. My mom was mostly around for our school activities. PTA, Room Mother, etc. Our dad traveled a lot or wasn't home much because of work. Also, he got brainwashed by the TV evangelist church he was working for. It made me hate religion for a while. My parents got divorced because he had an affair with a woman (atheist) who worked at that church with him and was invited into our home because our naive mother felt sorry for her! So he is still married to this woman and I have been cursed by her afflictions before she married my dumb dad! I smoke and drink like a fish. She was a smokaholic and alcoholic when she met my dad and quit a couple years after. I was a goody-two-shoes then all of a sudden I was smoking and drinking as a teenager. I must ask, "wtf???" She fricking retired after marrying my dad at like 34!!! My mom just turned 70 and she is still working!!! WTF???" Okay, where is the justice in that? <br />
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Your parents were there all the time but for whatever reason, you didn't think so. I don't know why. Just because they didn't pay attention to every single accomplishment??? I think that just their support for you explains much of your achievement. Just because they didn't go to every single game doesn't mean they didn't care. They don't have to be smothering you with cake, giant parties, banners and going to every single event to show that they care about you. I don't know why you are making such a big deal out of stuff that obviously didn't affect your growth in society all that much. I could understand if you turned into a crackhead, but you didn't. You should be glad for that.<br />
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After my parents' divorce, my dad was never around and my mom was working 70 hrs. a week. We had no babysitter because she couldn't afford one and my dad wouldn't take us because his wife didn't like kids. So we were on our own and ran loose. Who should wonder why? We were 2 young girls and not boys. I am sorry, but it seems to me that you did not appreciate your family. Just because they didn't go to every single event or praise you for every single achievement. What do you think happens to girls who are left to fend for themselves at an early age? Yeah, I totally can understand your frustration with an indifferent father. Can you understand total abandonment by one? As a girl???

Your situation sounds like it ws tough growing up in terms of your relationship with your Dad and stepmother, but just because your situation may have been harder to deal with doesn't mean you should try to minimize the pain the author is expressing. I've made the mistake of doing that in the past in reference to someone's death and afterward realized what a stupid insenitve idea that was to bring up. It's okay though, I'm sure everyone makes mistakes here and there. That's how we learn.

yes you have alot of responses did anyof them remind you that fghting the past is unnessicary? Look for an opertunity to change the future and no matter how big your sholders are do not take responsibility for problems that you did not cause especially from your childhood your oerachiving was a cry for attention witch is most likely never going to be met with what you'd expect. I'm concerned that this attitude of your family will carry into other interpersonal relations a few therapy sessions never hurt anyone but inless you are willing to solve the situation the right way nothing will come out of it goodluck I hope you get some peace and resolution

After reading yeshucan's comment to you, I don't think you owe him any apology.

Your entry really moved me.<br />
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"Am I just the sum of my experiences or is the state of my consciousness as I experience life the primary factor?" I love this bit. In your case I think having the benefit of hindsight makes you a better father to your children, as you can draw from past experiences and make the most of every family situation. <br />
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Thanks for sharing, and I wish you all the best.

I was deeply touched by your story. It is just so sad when a parent or parents aren't there for their kids whether it be physically or emotionally. I was fortunate to be blessed with kind and loving parents who were there for me but I have friends who were not so fortunate.<br />
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When I red your question as to who you are my first thought was that you are a self made man. You were able to rise above the neglect of your parent(s) at a very early age. You pushed yourself to do your best at sports even knowing that no family would be there for the awards ceremonies. You just did your best for yourself and that is something to be very proud of.<br />
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I also find it touching that you are willing to think of your dad with compassion or are at least willing to try. So many people would have become bitter and would have only hard feelings towards their father. You are living proof of what I have always said, that when a person is older they can make the decision to rise above their raising. You don't have to let the events of your childhood affect your live in a negative way but can instead have a positive outlook on life which you seem to have done very well. I wish you all the best with the rest of your life.

keep that winning spirit up . thumbs up ..

Congrats look at how many people have been moved by your story, does not in any way make up for your parents not being there, however you have risen above your parents failure to support you. I do not know if you have children, if you do what an opportunity to shine in ways your parents never did<br />
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Good Luck .

You know, I read your story and for all you fools out there, what happens during childhood does affect who we become as adults. Don't judge unless you have walked a mile in this person's shoes.<br />
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When I was 16, I got pregnant. Coming from a house with an overtly abusive stepmother and a father who always worked, this honestly was not surprising. When a person is neglected and abused at home, they go looking for love anywhere they can find it.<br />
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After I became pregnant and had my oldest daughter at 17, my father quit speaking to me. We did not have a relationship until I was 30. Because of this experience, I have to deal with an immense fear of rejection on a regular basis.<br />
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I get exactly how you feel. I have worked hard to overcome my fears and torments, but it is still a day to day struggle. Keep the faith...

parents have their flaws.. very little of us has had the opportunity or the luck to have one of those perfect types (if such exists) of parents. however, they are as they are and we have to make do with what was given. my hats off to you for rising over such past. i never did. i envy you.

My father has allways been there... in his house, but not with me. I am not an athlete, but I have trained swimming, swimmed for years including in open sea competitions. Once my father said that my swimming training was only a form of loosing work or business time. He has never invited or shared a beer with me. Has never said I love you. Has never given finnancial advice. Has critizized me when I quit a job because that I want to be more with my kids, because this quitting goes against money growth. Guess what? Everybody thinks well of him, that he is a good and great guy. And he is, in some ways. <br />
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Sometimes we forget that our fathers are humans, that they too had a personal struggle in life. We need to study them and have some pity, once we understand WHY they made those mistakes, it is possible to love or forgive them. The effort and sacrifice to raise kids is great. But giving love, only a few give quality love. <br />
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I hope you have a relationship with your spouse and kids that is good, so you can break, as you did in sports, the chain of failure - the failure to give affection.

Well thats really great. God put you in that position to grow as a person because He knew you can handle it. I feel so blessed i have supportive parents but thats really amazing how you've gone so far on your own, congratulations :)

Wow, reading all these stories has actually made me feel grateful. A little bit ashamed too of being so incredibly judgmental of my parents. My dad and I did have our issues when I worked for him, and when he taught me how to drive, at least he tried! He did yell at me and bring me down whenever I did something wrong. <br />
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This makes me feel more and more that there is something "wrong" with men, it's as if they were not taught how to be human but the opposite.<br />
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I did find sweet men in my life, never lost faith in men, I have a boyfriend who I deeply love, but I have heard just so many stories of men being bad fathers or not being there at all. My boyfriend has decided to cut his father out of his life recently and he really has no guilt whatsoever. He even wanted to be put for adoption as a child because he didn't feel good in his family.<br />
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What baffles me the most is: how come some people react one way and some another? <br />
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I have had plenty of conversations about life with my dad, he is actually quite a sensitive man and he even cries easily. His father was in a war for 4 years when he was 18, and he was sort of like your father Dog. As a granddaughter, I always felt weird about his lack of interest in talking to his own family. He did smile at small children, and animals, but he seemed unable to talk to me or any of us really. I asked him what he had for lunch once and he practically got offended by the question. My aunt, his daughter, did have a really rough time growing up with him and dealing with her life. Another aunt was kicked out of the house when became pregnant.<br />
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Anyway, my dad's childhood with his dad was SO much worse than mine, yet he dealt with his life as an adult very well. My childhood with my parents, now divorced, was perfectly decent except for some of their fighting, partly because of my dad's temper, and I just can't even begin to grow up. I am 24 years old and I have no ambition, my boyfriend supports me completely, I don't know what I want in life and I have had anxiety and panic episodes for years now, beginning before I my parents got divorced. They have a perfectly healthy relationship today, I am so proud of them, and I love them so much.<br />
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So I do admire you dog for your drive in life, whereas I have none, even with my parents support.<br />
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What I mostly encourage is your search for who you really are. You are not who you think you are, neither of us are. You are not your dad's unloved son, you are not the accomplished adult you grew up to be. <br />
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I feel so much for children who feel so negatively affected by their parents, myself included, that I really really don't even dare to attempt to be "better", I prefer not to be a mother at all. I don't know what I want to be, I don't know what I am.<br />
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I'd like to share this video with you all http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_uRIMUBnvw<br />
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And all I can offer is the attitude of acceptance, which is the healthiest I know.<br />
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Love and peace to all of you.

Your story touched me and makes me sad. You had to become your own cheer-leader and you have. You continued to achieve in so many areas and carried on with no family support. I can relate to this totally. There is always that emptyness inside and so what if you blew at someone who was critical towards you.? I'm sure you have a lot of pain in you that you've kept in abayyance. (spelling?). Anger covers pain and anyone who can't see how difficult it is to live one's life without any family support and being ignored to boot can't see reality. I am proud of you for doing what you've needed to make your own life worthwhile. And to your reaction to a negative comment, it just brought out in you what's always been there that loss of not having your family to commend and to congradulate you on your achievements. This is always going to be a loss since I as well came from a similar type of family. Not only was i ignored i was also abused in all ways. I as well went 'to the top' and was in Whose <br />
Who in America, Whose Who in the World and of American Woman and you know what? Not one accolade of congradulations from any of my family members. i had to give it to myself and one friend also gave me her blessings and her praise. I know from where you speak. You're good. You're brave and I see no need to apologize. it's true other people's reactions to our stories bring out a reaction in us that is a part of us and all it does is make us aware that it's there. Congradulations on your achievements. Blessings! Velvetflow

Support of family becomes very essential when one is down,whether mentally or physically. Family is a support system that everyone requires.<br />
But I think your family loves you in a way and its just that maybe they dont know how to express.<br />
The very fact that you were able to participate in national level games cant be 100% without the support of your family.You are very expressive and the fact that you spoke out this on Ep is the proof of it.<br />
just voice out your thoughts to your family and make them realise that you miss their words of wisdom and encouragement <br />
I am sure they will understand.