Betty the Beardie

In October 07, my youngest son purchased a Bearded Dragon.  I was convinced I would not like having this reptile in my house.  Or any reptile living under the same roof with me.  This beardie was very young and in need of a name.  My son decided that he would like me to name her.  Knowing that in order to name this dragon I would feel so inclined to spend time with her. (I don't like to name a pet without first getting to know the animal)  So I did spend time around this creature-dragon, and one day a name came to me - Betty.  

So the bearded dragon's name is Betty.  And I have come to like this gentle little creature very much.  She is very special to all of us.  A very accepted member of our family.  Alright, I'll admit it - "I'm crazy about her!"

A photo of Betty is the avatar I've chosen.

 ~ Tayer09

Tayer09 Tayer09
51-55, F
15 Responses Mar 5, 2009

awww ;)

awww ;)

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/my-bearded-dragon-growing-up/2049807887<br />
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Copy & Paste it in the google search engine - (or it might not work right.)

Her UV lights need to be turned off and a lamp with a heating element is turned on. Beardies need so many hours of UV light per day. And it being winter time they will do their version of hybernation (sleep more hide more) <br />
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Betty is so spoiled that she will stay upon a log and not hide under her shelter until someone comes and puts her under a shelter and turns the lights off for her. Ohften time at bedtime my son or myself will actually wrap her up in a soft blanket and hold her to our chest while she falls fast asleep. After a while we will put her in her enclosure, cover her, shut the lights off, and turn the heat-lamp on for her.

why do you have to put a beareded dragon to bed?

That settles it, I'm getting one. I can't get over how gorgeous they are, well, and how cute they are when they are little. I just need to find a breeder that will either ship them, a convention, or an upstanding pet store.

If you just mean posting more pictures of her in your albums all you need to do is make sure the pictures are below a certain size (I can't remember what it is but if you try and upload a picture that is to large, EP will remind you what size it has to be. :) ). If it is just for the albums here on EP all you have to do is go to your home page and below your avatar picture there will be something that says No Pictures Yet (or Albums if you have already done this). Beside that should be the word add. You click it and you can upload pictures directly from your computer without messing around with photobucket or that. :) Hope that helps!<br />
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And I read the entire comment. It was extremely helpful. Anymore information you have I would be excited to read!

The beard is intended to make the lizard look larger to potential foes. This is a common defense mechanism using a sort of camouflage to disguise their true capability like small men wearing thick jackets to appear bulkier and more muscular. <br />
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Bearded Dragons in the wild will often stand up on their hind legs to run from danger. This is actually slower than running on all fours, and might be a form of temperature control. The animals produce heat while running, and being cold blooded, have no good way to regulate their body temperature. Running on their hind legs puts their body farther away from the hot ground and improves airflow around them. This should allow them to run farther before having to stop. <br />
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They have a limited ability to change their color. In the wild, this is also used to hide and to regulate body temperature. Lighter colors reflect more light away from the body. This can also be used to show an emotional state, and when ill or injured they often have a black back and pale yellow legs. Despite this, the animals will attempt to hide illness until it becomes serious, possibly as a survival mechanism. <br />
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They should be kept away from lightning bugs, which are poisonous due to the phosphorous content. <br />
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Bobbing the head rapidly and a slightly curved tail tip show aggressiveness, while circular movements of the arms like waving show submission. They do ritualistic sparring matches with two bearded dragons circling each other, flat to the ground, beards and tails up and out, while biting each other’s tails. Usually no damage is done. Some owners report they can mimic this behavior patterns and get a similar response from their dragons, to the point of even maintaining eye contact. <br />
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The young are semi-arboreal, and spend much time in trees in the wild. Even the adults like to climb. While they are desert creatures, this does not mean they are well adapted to sand, which can be dangerous to them. Sand has sharp edges and can compact in the digestive system, blocking it and leading to death when the animal consumes it. <br />
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Breeders have managed to produce a variety of skin colors, but lizard green hasn’t yet been managed. Colors that exist include pastel oranges, violets and reds, with some popular morphs including “sand fire” and “tiger.” <br />
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The proper scientific name for the black soil bearded dragon is the Pogona henrylawsoni, and this particular species is often called Lawson’s Dragon and sometimes Rankin’s. The genus name is Pogona, but this was previously Amphibolurus, and books more than a couple of years old will show those names instead. <br />
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Why are they called Bearded Dragons?<br />
Because of their ability to puff out the skin under their chin and turn it dark so it looks like a beard. They are also called Beardies or abbreviated as BD.<br />
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How much do Bearded Dragons cost?<br />
I have personally seen them sell for as little as $15 in bulk price to as much as $900 for a colorful adult female. Prices depend on sex, size, color, age and lineage. Just remember that the price of the Bearded Dragon is only the beginning. You still need to buy the cage and all the supplies. That can run about $200+ depending on your choices.<br />
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Do they bite?<br />
Any animal with teeth can bite. If they are handled properly they generally do not bite. Their teeth are not sharp and pointy so if they do bite it is more pressure than puncture. Some BDs go through a stage (like children) where they try to push their limits to see how far they can go. They may puff their beard out and posture themselves to see if you are scared of them. That stage usually does not last more than a few weeks to a month.<br />
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How big will my Bearded Dragon grow?<br />
It varies due to many factors and they all grow at different rates. With proper husbandry, a Bearded Dragon of good genetic background can grow to between 16”-22”+. Just like people, they grow at different rates and have growth spurts where they grow so fast you can almost see them grow. Some factors that can influence the growth rate of a Bearded Dragon include: Genetic background, cage size, amount and type of food, competition for food, amount of light, type and amount of UV light, proper vitamins and supplements, Being raised indoor or outdoor, stress levels and the general happiness of the animal.<br />
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http://www.petpeoplesplace.com/resources/articles/reptiles/008-01.htm<br />
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~(~ Tayer :)<br />
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PDI (Past Dragon Info) - I am computer challenged so I have difficulty often times manageing all the bells and whistles (functions) of computer capabilities (?( So, I am trying to find a way to post more photos of Betty here... "Copy and Paste" feature won't comply, allowing me to do this. So WHEN (not if) I manage to find the magic formula to post photos here - I will be doing just bthat. Stay Tuned! (I'm staying optimistic)<br />
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Tayer <br />
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(q~P)<br />
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Awww, they get puffed up! <br />
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I would bet that they have conventions like those here, I just haven't found them yet. :) They have snake conventions so they may actually sell them there. How much do the little guys run for? And how big do they get? I could look it up, but I like hearing about Betty. haha

One of the amazing things about beardies is their docile, gentle nature - they never bite. If Betty is startled (which is rare) or made to feel anxious, her "beard" expands, puffing out, and turns darker - it's all part of an illusion to make her look larger and more fierce, dangerous, to a potential preditor. It looks pretty convincing too! But, that is her only means of defending herself, discouraging any thing bent on harming her. She's a sweetheart. And they are very clean animals too. Very easy to take care of. I'm looking into having a custom-made enclosed habitat made for her. She has out-grown the tank she is in right now. <br />
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I can't say enough good things about this gentle creature. She is really wonderful. :)<br />
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Our state had one of those big convention Expos in 2007, with all sorts of reptiles - that is where our son found Betty.

Ball pythons really are sweet animals, if you can get past the whole, they could potentially bite you when they aren't feeling well. Good thing is that you can tell by their body language what is going on with them. :) It's surprisingly easy. I used to be afraid of snakes too! I would definitely suggest making friends with an avid snake lover who can show you the proper way to handle them, it helps get over the fear rather quickly. :) Oh! And you can buy frozen mice and/or rats to feed them. <br />
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I'm going to look into this bearded dragon business. I wonder if there are any breeders in my state. I already have the set up from one of my snakes that passed away. I need to do my research to see if it's suitable. Thank you very much for the info! :D

Also: climate control is a necessity. Beardies are Ausies, so they like the heat.

I can't believe I'm saying this, but that's a beautiful ball python! One day I might graduate from beardies to phythons. But not yet. Snakes still give me the eebie-jeebies. I know it's all in my head.<br />
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Beardies don't eat mice. They eat crickets, mealy worms. Different greens veggies. Betty's favorite is italian parsley. Fruits, apples is her favorite. Carrots... sweet potatoes. etc. I can handle watching Betty eat bugs and woms. Watching a snake eat a mouse would feel to much like watching a pet get eaten. We've had hamsters, gerbels, and guinie pigs as pets. <br />
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~(~Tayer

I want a bearded dragon. :) Do they need the same care as ball pythons?